Changing Face Of Inuit Art

Changing Face Of Inuit Art

Inuit art form has become a collector’s prized possession in recent times. With the exposure that the art form has received in recent times, it is not difficult to find them in people’s living rooms the world over. This form of art is in fact considered to be a collectible among the elite people. The exposure to this art form has been largely created by the efforts of the Canadian government in an attempt to popularize the beautiful and traditional art practiced by the local inhabitants of the Arctic region. However, while the art form has received recognition throughout the world, it has also led Inuit community to move towards other occupations as well. Thus, on one hand there has been a surge in demand for the art and on the other there is a shortage of skilled artists. For a long time Inuit were hunters and sculptors. But, over a period of time people found better and more lucrative employment opportunities and drifted towards them. However, some intuit people continued with their traditional profession of creating beautiful art pieces out of stone. For these people stone carving holds religious significance. That’s because the Inuit art traditionally comprised of creating sculptures of worship. Such religious sculptures and figures were in a way then connected with nature. The art also majorly comprises of animal or human figures. The creativity of these artists is depicted by their carvings of animals, usually those found in the arctic region. Being ace hunters, it was easy for them to capture the beauty of animals into stone statutes. However, of late with the increasing demand for Inuit art, the younger generation of Inuit is drawing back towards their tradition. With more exposure to the outside world than their forefathers, they are bringing innovations to the art form. Instead of using ivory, other varieties of soft stones like soapstone are being used to create beautiful art works. Following the footsteps of renowned Inuit artists like Paul Kavik, Jimmy Iqaluq and Nuna Parr, these younger artists are trying to create art using the same method and tools but with a touch of contemporary feel. Several art galleries both online and off it too are providing these young artists the platform that they need to portray their skills. They list their products and interested Eskimo art lovers can buy them. Though they are relatively lower in price than those of the established Inuit artists, the Inuit art by the young generation artists is no less in terms of their quality.

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